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and representatives. there are more women serving at any time. there are 17 women serving in the united states senate and 74 women serving in the united states house of representatives. of those congresswomen currently serving, 14 are currently members of the c.b.c. since the first representative of color, patsy minching of hawaii won election in 1964, a total 39 women of color have served. 30 of these women were elected after 1990. and a total of 38 have served in the house of representatives where carol mostly brown of illinois is the only women to serve from 1993 to 1999. the first african-american was sharle chisholm. and there are some states who have never elected a woman to congress, delaware, iowa, mississippi and vermont and i look forward to having women from those states join us at some point, madam speaker. there are historic number of women currently serving in congress, including the first woman speaker of the house, nancy pelosi, who was elected speaker in 2007. the 111th congress understands that our nation's laws must include and respond to all our citizens, including women. women in
would be investigated. this is one many flawed parts of the resolution. the united states will remain a true friend to our ally, israel. so let us call for an open and honest debate with the reputable justice goldstone. let us not act in haste to pass a resolution that in no way achieve our ultimate goal of achieving a lasting peace for israelis and palestinians. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from minnesota is recognized. mr. ellison: may i inquire as to the time remaining? the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman has one 3/4 minutes remaining. mr. ellison: i yield one minute to the gentleman from massachusetts. >> i ask permission to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> this resolution should not be coming before us. there is an anti-israel bias in the united nations, but it should be the responsibility of every member of this house to bring it back to the peace talk table. this resolution does not do that. this resolution heightens the rhetoric of division. regardless of what you think of the goldstone report, it makes an
on several cases against those who seek to terrorize the united states using the full range of authorities and capabilities available to us. just as president obama is using our military diplomatic, legal, law enforcement and moral force to make america safer and more secure, the attorney general is exercising his responsibilities in consultation with the secretary of defense to determine where and how best to seek justice against those who have attacked americans here at home and around the world. after nearly eight years of delay, may finally move -- be moving forward to bring to justice the perpetrators and murderers from the september 11 attacks. i have great confidence in our attorney general. the capability of our prosecutors, our judges, our juries and the american people. in this regard. i support the attorney general's decision to it pursue justice against khalid shaikh mohammed and four others accused of plotting the september 11 attacks and go after them in our federal courts in new york. they committed murder here in the united states and we'll seek justice here in the united s
to be friends. >> the united states does not seek to contain china nor does a deeper relationship of china mean a weakening of bilateral alliances. on the contrary. the rietz of a strong prosperous china can be a source of strength for community of nations. >> as parted of his charm offensive before midnight tonight eastern time about an hour, 45 minutes from now the president is scheduled to participate in a town hall style meeting with an audience of mostly young people in the big chinese city of shanghai with the latest on that from shanghai major garrett who is traveling with the president joins us. hey, major, what's the buzz on this town hall? is it expected to be adoring or confrontational? >>> oo it will probably be something in between. they are dickering or fighting over each other in the contours or consent to the town mall. to circumvent the election to control the events being imposed to president obama the white house invited and collected through the u.s. embassy questions through the web site for the past couple weeks. the president will get those unseen in the course of the tow
that was licensed in the united states. we have done those things. we have shifted all the vaccine manufacturing to the extent we can to multi those virus first because there faster to fill, with leaving the rest of leftover for the single dose syringes. we have worked with them to shift everything they can do to get the vaccine out as fast as they possibly can. then we are tracking through the process step by step. to the degree that when a lot is ready to be released at a manufacturer, we have a truck waiting. it pulls up at the loading dock ready to accept that vaccine and bring it to the distribution sites. if we have been working through this every step of the process to get any delays out. that is what a sight visits have largely been about. >> a question about the contracts. [unintelligible] to produce this reject all under 51 million doses, kabbalah contracted the manufacturers to fill 117 million doses. why aren't they able to undo the full amount of doses -- able to do the full amount of doses? >> we need to make sure we have enough vaccine derived the time people want it and being ca
's making the choice for you. the u.s. -- the united states, america, is the world's largest economy. it's three times larger than our closest competitor, japan. and it's larger than the economies of japan, china, germany, and great britain combined. and we got there through innovation. we got there through choice. we got there through competition. we got there through individual initiative and responsibility. not government control and management. as we have seen time after time, when you substitute a government controlled and run program for individual choice, the cost goes up, the quality goes down. and when it comes to health care, there's nothing more important than quality and choice. given the choice, i'll always place my faith in the individual not the government and this time is no different. no different with the credit card legislation, no different with the health care legislation. mr. chairman, let me conclude by saying many of my colleagues in this body, both republicans and democrats, are going to come in and they are going to vote for this legislation today. they are goin
? >> it has been across the continental united states, and beyond. the associated press and newspapers in eight different states, big ones, like massachusetts, colorado, michigan, georgia, have all discovered wildly inflated or exaggerated claims. fox news has confirmed that these phantom districts have been included for at least nine other states, including nevada. where stimulus recipients made claims of jobs created on the behalf of the 25th district, even though only three districts exist. gregg: the white house is taking some heat from the democratic party on this. talk about that. >> true, the chairman of the house appropriations committee spoke with fox news moments ago telling us that the publication of false data will lead citizens to doubt the they know what the obama administration is doing. that led to a stinging statement last night, special assistant to the president on stimulus said this morning that -- gregg: james, thank you very much. one industry that is passing a big increase in jobs? solar power. the average solar energy company increased its payroll by 70% from 20
basically has completely destroyed the power of the united states by his namby-pamby stuff on intelligence, by his huge budget deficit and gigantic expansion of the debt. he's made the united states into a beg ar nation. and if you like obama, you think he's weak. if you don't like him, you think he's just wrong and sometimes bad intentioned. i learned something the other day that just blew my minds. obama announced that he wasn't going to put missiles in poland, and he did that on september 17. now, apart from my wife's birthday, that date has no significance to me. but to the polls it does. it was the date russia invaded poland in 1939. and to remove the missile shield on that gate was effectively telling the russians, come on in, she's yours. and obama knew it. had to have known it. that state department would have flagged that and said don't do it on the 17th. he did it to send a message to russia saying, she's all yours, kid. sean: that's a frightening thought. dick, good to see you. don't forget, we're going to have the first cable exclusive interview with sarah palin on her brand-ne
wing, it must have been breathtaking. >> it was the most beautiful room in the united states, they said. it is a gorgeous room. except for the purpose for which it was built, so the people could hear one another. the acoustics were dreadful. for the public, it is amazing how much that we build resembles a real approach. you used marble. you cannot expect the acoustics to be good, and they are not. people would babel away -- babble away. sounds whispered at one end could be heard in another position. >> to help with the sound problems, large red drapes were hung all round the hall. with the house now residing in its own wing, the original north section of the capitol was reconstructed. with both wings now completed, construction had begun on the middle part of the building until tragedy struck in the summer of 1814. the war of 1812 made its way to washington. >> with a very inferior force, they swept the americans assaad and came to washington, seized it, and burned every public building. they burned the capitol, they burned the white house, and they did not burn the one place that they
of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. . -- the speaker pro tempore: the chair will entertain requests for one-minute speeches. for what purpose does the gentlelady from arizona rise? >> i ask permission to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. kirkpatrick: mr. speaker, on november 5, a university held their symposium dedicated to issues on homeland security on its prescott, arizona, campus. unfortunately, the house held votes that day and i could not attend, but i heard it was a fantastic event. this year's theme was challenges for homeland security in the 21st century, and panelists from the f.b.i., the c.i.a. and t.s.a., the arizona department of public safety, and from the worlds of academia, among other places. topics covered a wide range of issues such as sipersecurity, public-private partnerships -- cybersecurity, public-private partnerships and coordination between local and federal law enforcement. i congratulate the faculty at the camp
the cases should be brought. >> that assumes that the person is in the united states for one thing and he is not. let me close with this point. you said, and this really bothers me, mr. attorney general, with all due respect. for eight years justice has been delayed for the victims of the 9/11 attacks. i want to put in the record, mr. chairman, ask unanimous consent to enter justice delayed by andrew mckarthy and i'll quote two paragraphs from this. this is chutzpah at large, he writes. the reason there were so few military trials is the tireless campaign conducted by leftist lawyers to derail military tribunals by challenging them in the courts. many of those lawyers are now working for the obama justice deputy and that includes holder who volunteered his services to at least 18 of america's enemies and lawsuits they brought to the american people and it concludes within two years ksm and four fellow war criminals stood ready to plead guilty and proceed to execution and then the obama administration blew into washington. want to talk delay? obama shut down the commission by pleading guil
the united states senate votes on whether to let debate on the health care reform bill begin. the republicans are all voting nay. if the democrats can't get 60 votes, that's it. it's over. it looks like they can do it. health care leaves the senate station. the top of the show tonight. >>> plus president obama has his chin out on just about every hot issue out there. health care, terror trials, job losses, even the breast cancer report. he is exposed and vulnerable. his poll numbers are dropping. is he just too darned intellectual? too much the egg head? why did he bow to that japanese emperor? why did he pick tim geithner to be his economic front man? why all of this dithering over afghanistan? and who thought it was a wonderful idea to bring the killers of 9/11 to new york city? the media capital of the world to tell their story? is obama channeling adlai stevenson? and 46 years after the jfk assassination, sunday is the anniversary. we are still learning fascinating details in the frantic hours after the shooting. especially about lbj. the author of a new book on the kennedy assassination
as a citizen of the united states is just appalling. i think eric holder should have left them in guantanamo bay and be tried there. i lived in new york in 2000 and 2001. it was just terrible. for them to be tried in a federal court, it just speaks to this country to give people that do not ware uniforms, do not apply to the geneva convention to come to our country and then be given rights like a citizen. host: david, in this newspaper article, attorney general holder elected to proceed with the first u.s. criminal prosecution alleged to have been directly involved in the plot eight years ago that targeted the world trade center and pent he gone because of his full confidence in the successful outcome. tell us why you are not as convinced of the outcome? caller: i'm not confident because i believe that in our country, people are innocent until proven guilty. when you use water boarding and all these things they are trying to use against ournqq governmen why should a terrorist be given rights in our country. host: let's go to the democratic line. caller: i think they should be tried here. t
, opening up new opportunities for u.s. workers here in the united states of america which is exactly what is being said to president obama as he meets in korea at this moment with their leadership. with president lee and others. so i think that we need to have our attention in this congress focused on the priorities -- the priorities the american people have. fire fighting is very, very important. but again this measure will pass if not unanimously narrowly unanimously and it will do so and i hope get the resources to ensure that we never have the loss of life like those of captain hall and others. but i know from having spoken to their families, mr. speaker, that they believe that the absolutely essential for us to encourage private sector job creation and economic growth and that's why i'm talking about this priority that needs to be addressed here. now, mr. speaker, i'm going to urge my colleagues to defeat the previous question as we move ahead. why? because the issue of reading legislation is another very, very important one that is before us. there is a bipartisan proposal launched
the train is leaving the station. tomorrow night the united states senate. votes on whether to let debate on the health care reform bill begin. the republicans are all voting nay. if the democrats can't get 60 votes, that's it. it's over. it looks like they can do it. health care leaves the senate station. the top of the show tonight. >>> plus president obama has his chin out on just about every hot issue out. there health care, terror trials, job losses, even the breast cancer report. he is exposed and vulnerable. his poll number are dropping. is he just too darned intellectual? too much the egg head? why did he bow to that japanese emperor? why did he pick tim geithner to be his economic front man? why thought dithering over afghanistan and who thought it was a wonderful idea to write the killers of 9/11 to new york city? the media capital of the world so they could tell their story? is obama channeling adlai stevenson? >>> and sunday is the anniversary of the jfk. what really happened in the frantic hours after the shooting. especially about lbj. the author of a new book on the kennedy
with the united states as the only nation in the industrialize think world that does not guarantee health care to all people. yet we spend substantially more than any other country and our outcomes are worse. clearly we need major health care reform. >> that's a point of view from the liberal democrats. senator greg, what is the republican view on health care? how is it different from the democrat view? this is a strict party line vote we're seeing tomorrow night. >> well, clearly we disagree with senator sanders. i really respect bernie's forthrightedness. he is telling it like it is, a single payer system like the english or canadian system. we genuinely believe a single payer system will undermine the quality of health care in this country. and it is not affordable. this bill is a $2.5 trillion-dollar bill. that's what it spends when it is fully phased in over a ten-year period. it would if it led to a single payer system. and i happen to think it is a precursor to that. put the government in charge of every aspect of health care in a very direct way so that you would end up with basically
family. >> fred, fred, fred. she ran for vice president of the united states last year, she is running for president next time. let me ask you, fred, if you had to choose between sheer confidence and ability to be the next president, mitt romney, or sarah palin? who is more competent to be the next president, the next republican nominee for president? >> oh, come on, you know i'm not going to answer. i think we've got four or five -- four or five -- >> you said she is not even running. but fred, i caught you. i caught you. he said she is not even running. you -- i caught you right there. your hesitancy. you said she is not a candidate. >> you said who is more qualified. who is more qualified. >> what you've got to understand, it's better to lose with goldwater than to win with rockefeller. when the pendulum comes your way, you want the people you believe in who are going to do the things you went into politics to get done to be there, not just to be in power and say we've got an honor by our name in the white house. >> here is a question for you, fred, and you have been in the campaign
't have enough jails there why do we have any jails empty in the united states at taxpayer expense? maybe that's a whole another issue. why do we have a whole federal prison sitting there? is it because some of these prisoners in california are not federal prisoners? peter: only 200 minimum security prisoners at that facility at this point. and we don't mix state and federal prison population. gretchen: but we will bring terrorists there? on its face it seems weird to me that we wouldn't be able to find some use of this prison, instead of bringing some of the world's worst terrorists there. steve: and we were talking about whoever becomes members of that jury for can a lead sheik mohammed their families could be a target. the people of the surrounding area there in illinois, some of them feel like you bring these guys here then suddenly we will be the focus of jihadi and stuff like that. we don't like that. congressman kirk who is going to join us in 45 minutes wrote this letter to the administration. quote: steve: mark kirk is going to be joining us very promptly to talk about that gitmo
be a good idea to admit the deposed and ailing shah of iran, to the united states for medical treatment. well, two weeks later we found ourselves in the embassy behind a steel door on the second floor of the old chancellor ri, the dearly-beloved henderson high that some of you may remember. and on the other side banging on the, banging on the door were this group of unhappy, unhappy iranians. well, it befell to me to -- having made one of probably the worst decisions of my foreign service career -- to go out from that door, to go out from behind the door and attempt, and i use this word with some trepidation, to negotiate with this, with this crowd to see if there was something we could do. maybe we could get them out or at least delay them because what was very clear to us already was that there was, we were on our own. that if anything was going to be done, we had to do it. we had made calls to the iranian government at the time or at least what passed for the iranian government, something called the provisional government of iran. and it was very clear from that contact that there wa
of israelis and palestinians to live in peace and security. it is also in the interest of the united states. it is urgently needed. the president knows that achieving this goal will be difficult, but he also has said that he will not weaver and his persistent pursuit of comprehensive peace in the middle east. for that reason, he has dedicated himself and his administration to the resumption of israeli-palestinian negotiations and to the creation of an atmosphere that maximizes the prospects for success. to be clear, the steps we have suggested to all parties -- israel, the palestinians, and the arab states -- to improve the atmosphere for negotiations are not ends to themselves, and they certainly are not preconditions to negotiations. but they can make a valuable contribution toward achieving our goal of successful negotiations that result in a two-state solution. that's why we've urged the palestinians to expand and improve their security efforts and to take strong and meaningful action on incitement. it's why we have urged the arab states to take steps toward normalization of relations w
portfolios over the largest bank holding companies of the united states accounting for about 2/3 of all the assets of the banking system. we were able to look across banks and examiners and asset classes and combined our usual examination procedures with off sight surveillance done by economists using a wide range of statistical methods. i think we learned a largement in that exercise -- large amount in that exercise. the confidence in the banking sector rose significantly but we also learned great deal about how to examine banks in a comprehensive way across the entire system. . i think, henry, i think going forward what we really need to know will be how to examine the system as a whole. i think one of the failures of regulatory oversight during the crisis was our -- when i talk about regulators in general, how individual firms and how each individual firm is doing. one of the things we've learned and very challenging for us as we go forward will be that we need to look at the whole system. we need to see how the markets have interact with each other. have interact with each other. we
and civilians of the united states army at fort hood, texas, were attacked by the least likely of assailants. it was, in short, an act of treason. i want to first thank my colleague and good friend, representative john carter of texas, who represents fort hood in his district, for introducing this legislation to give all members of congress the opportunity to stand here today and support of the brave men and women at fort hood and their families in such a time of trial. fort hood lies just north of my district, north of austin. it's in central texas, many of us all across this nation have constituents who have gone through fort hood to train for the wars in iraq and afghanistan. . i have had many constituents who trained at fort hood. yesterday was a drark chapter. in the aftermath we learned that 13 of our finest americans were killed and several dozen more were wounded. this senseless act of horror betrayed our -- betrays our respect and deepest sempthi for life. our thoughts and prayers are with each of the families affected by this tragedy. during this tragedy, there were reports of many
already slated to come to the united states. in fact, to come here to new york city because they are going to stand trial for the 9/11 attacks. among them, the self-proclaimed master mind, khalid shaikh mohammed. as you can imagine there are strong opinions whether his trial in civilian court works to his advantage. >> what we're kind of granting his wish. his wish was to be brought to new york and really makes no sense to me to be granting him his wish. he should be tried in a military tribunal. he is a war criminal. this was an act of war. >> the sheik, mohammed, wants to be considered a holy warrior, a jihadist, if we try him before military offices that image of a soldier will be portrayed by the islamic community. that's not the image we want. >> julie: we have the fox news team coverage of the latest developments. live in chicago, but first let's get to julie kirtz live in washington. so, julie, what are guiliani's main objections to the trials being held here in new york? >> yeah, he was pretty outraged. made a couple of points on fox news sunday. conducting trial in fork city will
trafficking is actually done out of the prison system in the united states. particularly the california prison system. and he mentioned one prison, pelican bay, in specific. and then i came back, and i found that there are all these cell phones in prisons which enables a group, name live the mexican mafia, to essentially use cell phones to give directives right out of prisons on hits, on territories, on dealers, and i think this is a very serious thing. i've introduced legislation that would make cell phones contraband in federal prisons with possession punishable by up to an additional year in prison. what do you think of this? what are you doing? it is a real problem, mr. attorney general. >> it is a real problem, senator. i had experience with that when i was the united states attorney here in washington, d.c. rapel edmonds was convicted, sent to jail and continued to run his drug enterprise from prison, was convicted again for that. the maintenance of cell phones in prison, i think, is unacceptable and i think we have to find ways in which we conif i skate them. you're right, they ought to
you. >> it is and gentlemen, welcome to the chamber of commerce of the united states of america. my name is ron summers of the u.s.-india business council. for 34 years we have strived to advance u.s.-india commercial ties. today, what a historic event we have before us. more than ever, the business communities of both our countries are needed to provide an impetus to this important relationship. ladies and gentleman, please stand with me and help me welcome the individuals who are making this possible -- tom donahue, into a newly, ambassador chancre, and the hon. prime minister of india, dr. manmohan singh. [applause] >> thank you very much. good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. prime minister singh, ambassadors, distinguished guests, welcome to the united states chamber of commerce. mr. prime minister, we are delighted to be hosting you and your delegation today. we are certain you will have a productive visit to the united states. you are among friends. joining us today are some of the foremost business leaders in america and india. we extend a special welcome to the chair of the
for racial justice in the united states as a matter of human rights law for quite some time. i stand here almost 6 feet tall, standing on the shoulders of people like wpp the boys -- web dubois and various song and the unsung heroes who saw that our struggle in the united states to transition from chattel slaves to persons, from persons to citizens, and we are still moving in that direction, that that was not just about what happens in the united states to people of african descent who so happen to of landed here. it is part of a conversation. we are part of a global community and part of understanding the notion that perhaps we're post-civil rights is recognizing that the way we got to civil-rights was an unnecessary narrowing of our own agenda, which was couched in human rights terms until mccarthyism, communist scare forced us to narrow our agenda rather than to embrace the fullness of the agenda as it was originally understood. what did we lose? in moving from human-rights to civil rights, we moved in the direction that imposes on our government no obligation to ensure that the rights
, and because the united states started the battle in muslim countries. has sn accused of shooting and killing 13 people at ft. hood. s he is still in the hospital. >>> and president obama is in china. china financed massive sums of u.s. debt. part of the president's talks may include assurances those investments are safe. the president held a town hall meeting with college students in shanghai where he push for greater freedoming in china. >> we do not seek to impose any system of government on any other nation, but we also don't believe that the principles that we stand for are unique to our nation. these freedoms are expression and worship, are access to information and political participation, we believe, are universal rights and should be available to all people, including ethnic and religious minorities, whether they are in the united states, china or any nation. >> president obama will also visit china's great wall today. >>> and the obama administration says people trying to politicize the president's vow to japan's emperor and every pris are way, way off base. president obama greeted
. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the -- the yeas are 233. the speaker pro tempore: the resolution is adopted. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the speaker: the house -- the chair lays before the house a communication. the clerk will read. the clerk: the honorable the speaker, house of representatives, madam. i have the honor to transmate here with a copy of a letter received from kathy mitchell, head of the elections commission of the california elections offer, and according to the returns of the special election on november 3, 2009, john garamendi was elected to the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from california rise? one moment, please. clerk will resume. the clerk will resume. the clerk: indicating t
, the united states has been using a base technology to create vaccine. while it is safe and effective, it's a slow-moving process. across europe, vaccine developers are using the faster process of incorporating the million sales to grow the vaccine. as we begin to explore cell-based technology, i would pose the question will there be an adequate fda approval for this new vaccine? i'm also interested in hearing in the vaccine manufacturers from how they ramped up reduction in some cases to ten times their normal production schedule. we know that production of a delayed for h1n1, a harmful but relatively moderate virus compared to something more lethal like the spanish flu. but in the case of a stronger virus, the higher fatality rate, what our country be able to produce enough vaccine for everyone in a short time. here it so i look forward to questioning the witnesses, welcome them again, learning more about how we can improve vaccine reduction in our country and again thank the chairman for this joint an important hearing. i yield back. >> thank you ms. eshoo. gentleman from pennsylvania,
. as you know, that has always been a controversial issue in the united states house of representatives and no less so today. if that measure passes, then it is believed that a great number of sort of moderate democrats could then get on board with the idea of this health care reform bill. and we have right now congressman joe wilson from south carolina who is standing by. congressman, we may have to break out of this, if the president comes out. i know you'll understand, but tell me very quickly, what are you hearing on the floor today about the status of this legislation? >> well, it's really up to the blue dogs, are they going to be independent or are they going to be lap dogs and take directions from speaker pelosi. today is going to be the crucial day. people will find out. persons who said they're blue dogs, are they blue or lap dogs. >> brian: and you have proposed a motion that would basically make members of congress take the so-called public or government option, if that becomes the law of the land. do you think that will have any legs? >> it should, i was able to get the man
, developed by some of the highly regarded independence institutions in the united states, are meeting with strong resistance. >> i want to know as soon as possible if they have a cancer. if i'm only going to get a mammogram every two years and i have missed something for every two years, the impact on that patient is immeasurable. >> reporter: the researchers stress that finding tumors early does not always translate into saving lives and this vast body of evidence speaks for itself. >> women need to understand that there is a small additional benefit from starting screening at age 40 to 49, compared with starting later. but there also are a set of couple la lating harms. >> reporter: the big problem is between between the ages of 40 and 49 could have denser breasts, which could mean screenings more unreliable. that could mean more false positives, higher tests and higher costs and more pain for the patient. one of the most high-powered organizations which disagrees with the american cancer society, which still recommends the routine annual screening. >> the reason we make that recomm
these people to the united states. i can't imagine the people of illinois would like to have these prisoners incars rated this their state. i expect it will be a huge issue in illinois, probably in the u.s. senate race up there next year. >> chris: and is there anything you can do in terms of blocking funding for it? >> we will be looking for ways to do it and hopefully the senate and house will speak on this issue. >> chris: let's turn to healthcare reform. senate democrats are expected to bring a bill to the floor this week. do you have the 41 votes in the senate to prevent them from even bringing it to the floor? >> what we do know for sure is this is a bill that cuts medicare and raises taxes and raises insurance premiums. it has been in harry reid's office for six weeks and the other 99 senators have not seen it. we ought to at least have as much time for the other 99 senators and all of the american people to take a look at this bill as majority leader reid has had. the only way to guarantee that for sure would be to delay the process to allow everyone to fully understand what is in th
a town hall meeting with chinese students. he pointed out the united states and china admit huge amounts of green house gases. >> unless both of our countries are willing to take critical steps in dealing with this issue, we will not be able to resolve it. >> reporter: the president also told the students he's a big supporter of noncensorship. china employs some of the tighter controls over what its citizens can access on the internet. >>> the governor of illinois is trying to sell a nearly empty prison. federal officials are scheduled to inspect the thompson correctional center. the illinois governor says the site is under consideration along with two others in colorado and montana. >>> five after the hour. time for the first "living $mart" report of the morning and jessica doyle is here with a preview of the day on wall street. a good end in last week. >> very nice. we hope another wave of buying takes us higher this week. the dow rose 2 1/2% last week boosting the gain nurse the year to 17%. the dow is at 10270. after another rally pushed them up by 73 points on friday. the nasdaq add
of open candid conversations that lead to decisions being made that will benefit the united states and move us toward goals like more peaceful prosperous outcomes for us and many parts of the world. secondly, i think it is important to underscore that we see the fight against al qaeda and the syndicate of terror in the security interest of the united states. i think that kind of got lost the last eight years with a lot of talk about how it wasn't important to get bin laden, you know, that we were there for some other reason. no. it's critical to get those who attacked us. that is what we are there for and what we are trying to do is to assess the best way forward so that we can go anywhere in the united states and anywhere in the world and say the same thing. you have to understand that we believe this syndicate of terror is a threat, not just to the united states and our friends and allies, but to pakistan, afghanistan and many others. >> let me turn to the issue of china where you and the president head next. the lead of the new york times story out this morning about the preside
. bangladesh is a country of 1 sixty million people, half that of the united states. a three foot rise in sea level would put a good part of the become dulled the beneath the sea. that produces half of the rice for vietnam. a country of eighty million people and the country that is the world's second rising rice exporter after thailand. others will be affected in varying degrees by rising sea level. imagine ice melting in the far north atlantic will shrink the rice harvest of asia. but this is not the most serious threat. that is coming from melting mountain glaciers. the glacier monitoring institute in switzerland has now reported the eighteenth consecutive year of shrinking mountain glaciers around the world. they monitor glaciers in the andes and the rocky mountains, the alps, the himalayas, the tibetan plateau and they're reporting glaciers are melting everywhere. it is the ice melts from the glaciers in the himalayas and on the tibetan plateau that sustains the major rivers of asia during the dry season. it is that i smelled that sustains the rivers that also sustains the irrigation syst
that whenever its firepower, the united states is impatient and will eventually go away. a visit to afghanistan reveals both sides of this complicated and ambitious strategy." we want to be more of your reaction to this story about king abdullah -- to this story about the withdrawal of abdullah abdullah. caller: this is a way for obama to disentangle himself from afghanistan under the pretense that we cannot further sacrifice troops in support of a government that is obviously corrupt. thank you. host: the secretary of state had the only response yesterday. israel put forth what the secretary called unprecedented concessions. netanyahu offered them in an effort to restart peace talks, a departure of the administration's earlier criticism of israel. meanwhile, the story this morning is inside a "the new york times." -- inside of "the new york times." "the secretary of state failed on saturday to slow down and not stopped the jewish construction of settlements on the west end. edward, good morning. caller: we need to enhance our relationships with all people. i think that obama should stand up an
stronger and more capable of action and turn it into a strong partner for united states. we can build a strong partnership on this basis. first with russia, china and india. for ladies and gentlemen, the world we live in today is both freer and more integrated than ever before. the fall of the berlin wall, the technological revolution and information and communication technology and the rise of china, india and other countries and dynamic economies, all of this has changed the world of the 21st century into something completely different from what we knew in the 20th century, and this is a good thing, for freedom is the very essence of our economy and our society. . man ca e he's free. but what is also clear is that freedom does not stand alone. it is freedom in responsibility and freedom to show and shoulder responsibility. for this the world needs an underlying order. but the near collapse. but the near collapse. financial market has shown when is none, when there is no underpinning order. there is -- if there is one lesson the world has learned from the financial crisis of last yea
to amend title 38, united states code and the service -- service members civil relief act to make certain improvements in the law regarding benefits administered by the secretary of veterans affairs and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the s hat foreigners see this a bit differently. they think we are -- so that foreigners see this a bit differently. they think we are not doing nearly enough. host: next call, joe, good morning. caller: thank you for c-span. i would like to hear more on the mountaintop removal situation in west virginia. our climate is definitely changing because of mountaintop removal. we have had 2 million acres in the appalachians destroyed, one of the most reverse ecosystems in the world: flattened. over 2,000 miles of streams have beenuried. 62% of our streams are in west virginia -- 62% of our streams in west virginia are known to be polluted with heavy metals. the fish are contaminated. you cannot eat fish out of the streams. if you live in the proximity, a report that was suppressed by the bush
for the senate he opposes the idea to bring them to the united states in part because he thinks he is going to make illinois a terror target. i talked to a national security expert who has been in the years. he laughed at that. he said look, are you kidding me. terrorists go for high value targets, big places like new york and washington as we saw on 9/11. they're not going for a town in 500. he laughed and said, are you kidding. that is going to be among the safest places in the world because there is only 500 premium. am i right? >> that was the first thing i thought of. terrorism is about the unexpected. major impacts from this. if there is going to be one safe place in america, it will be that town. >> gregg: congressman brown, it doesn't make sense in many ways? >> you are misconstruing what mark kirk is saying. he is saying it's going to bring terrorist attacks to america, like chicago and new york city. we're going to showcase these people, freedom hating cold-blooded murderers, the worst to the shores of the united states. these aren't criminals, they are enemy combatants. anybody t
. the united states will host the apec summit in hawaii. >>> some guantanamo bay detainees could be transferred to this prison in northern illinois. two obama administration officials tell cnn federal officials will visit the thompson correctional center tomorrow, it's about 150 miles west of chicago. illinois governor pat quinn described the prison as state of the art and virtually empty. the obama administration promised to close guantanamo by january 22nd, but it's having trouble meeting that deadline. >> we now know, after many months in office, that there aren't nations out there who are going to take these 200 or so detainees left if guantanamo so the idea of relocating these prisoners in the united states is a reality that the obama administration is confronting. >> a republican lawmaker from chicago is already saying that would invite terrorist attacks on illinois. an obama administration official says the prison would be even more secure than the nation's only supermax prison. >>> police in north carolina have charged the mother of a missing 5-year-old girl with human trafficking. anto
home the olympics, but he's bringing home some tourism to his home state. the united states will host the apex summit in hawaii in 2011. the host gets to dictate what guests wear for the summit's official picture. the president says he looks forward to seeing the other leaders decked out in flowered shirts and grass skirts. >>> some guantanamo bay detainees could be transferred to this prison in northern illinois. two obama administration officials tell cnn federal officials will visit the correctional center tomorrow, about 150 miles west of chicago. illinois governor pat quinn described the prison as state of the art and virtually empty. the obama administration promised to close guantanamo by january with 22nd, but it's having trouble meeting that deadline. >> we know now, after many months in office, that there aren't nations out there who are going to take these 200 or so detainees left in guantanamo so the idea of relocating these prisoners in the united states is a reality that the obama administration is confronting. >> a republican lawmaker from chicago is already saying that
says the united states' artificially low interest rates are creating a bust and boom cycle of speculation in commodities like gold and oil and stocks like oil and real estate, undermining the economic recovery, because the chinese know that president obama will criticize them for having artificially low currency, and the president talks about economics not being a zero sum game, some in china believe that it very well might be. bret. bret: major garrett live tuesday morning in beijing. we will discuss the president's trip to china later plus brit hume looks at the fallout from the president's weekend bow to the japanese emporer, but first retail sales rose 1.4% in october. that was better than experts predicted. stocks today had a big day. the dow was up 136 1/2. the s&p 500 gained almost 16. nasdaq finished 30 ahead. general motors says it lost $1.2 billion from the time it left bankruptcy protection through september 30. that was a better result than in previous quarters. g.m. says it will begin paying back $6.7 billion in government loans by the end of this year, and cou
in the united states efficiently, cost effectively and so forth. some manufacturing should be done in china. too much manufacturing is being done in china that could be done more effectively in the united states. >> jim agrees and hopes other manufacturers will follow his lead. >> i think people are afraid to make the commitment to lean, to automation, to reinvesting in the factories, because they have this stigma in their mind. they have this belief that you can't make it effectively and profitably in america. it is not true. i think people give up on manufacturing in america prematurely and it can be done. >> ali velshi, cnn, new york. >>> being confined to wheelchairs is not stopping some people who have found a way to get their competitive juices flowing. we are going to introduce you to a game that made it's mark overseas but it is now catching on in the u.s. >>> tiger woods is not talking about his one-car accident. hear what investigators heard when they went to his house to get answers. >> get out of my face. what are you doing? >> cindy sheehan had an explosive exchange with a man who s
of the discussion has been around the fence that the united states wants to pursue a counterterrorism strategy where they target specific regions of afghanistan. there's an understanding that if you seven of troops to blame did the entire country that it would take something like half a million troops. nobody is talking about that. there are specific regions, especially in the southern part of afghanistan and, that they're talking about increasing the troops as a way of giving them more control over those regions and an ability to push back against the extremists, the taliban, and al-qaeda. host: what will he be asking of nato? guest: there have been many discussions over the past months to try to increase the number of troop commitments from nato countries as a way of allowing the united states to have slightly less of a commitment. in the speech, i think you will see a strong call from the president for the nato allies and the other allies around world to step up. host: thank you very much for being with us this morning, michael shear. there are a number of "washington post"front page stories. thi
responses came back from yemen to hasan in the united states. among the things he told the "the washington post," or actually told this interviewer that's reported in the "the washington post" that he in no way pressured or ordered hasan to carry out the acts that took place at fort hood, although, of course, he has said that after the fact he dogs appreciate and approve of what happened there, jon. jon: u.s. officials knew about these details and nothing was done. is anybody investigating the investigators here? >> it starts with the president who, of course, did order this administration review of all of the documents involving the investigation of hasan to find out who knew what and when and whether any signals were overlooked. the army may do the very same thing, have an internal review, take a hard look at itself it will be an independent review. we just don't know when. we expect it to be a imings of civilian and military personnel on that independent panel. and meantime, the fbi already has a similar internal probe underway by the inspector general at the fbi. jon? jon: what are we
challenges with these prisoners. why move them into the united states while we are still under the threat from radical jihadists? >> schieffer: i want to turn to the massacre at fort hood because you were one of those in congress who immediately began pressing the government for answers when they were giving out very little information. where do you think this thing stands now, congressman? are you satisfied with where it's going so far? >> no, i ti that the government has been too slow in giving us information. there hasn't been enough transparency for members of congress, for the press or for the american people. i think that we need to move very, very aggressively and do a full-scale investigation as to who knew what and where. you know, this alaki guy in yemen. he's been on our radar screen since 2001, 2002. my sources tell me we had evidence back in 2002 that would have enabled us to prosecute him. why didn't we prosecute him then? the other thing i want to know is people want to know who he's been talking to in the middle east. i want to know what alaki is talking to in the united s
service and the united states attorney in that area. >> just a follow-up on april's questi question. >> her question was a follow-up. >> a triple follow on, the social office knows the list -- >> sheryl -- >> they would have overheard the couple announce themselves and it wouldn't have required a phone call. it wouldn't have -- they would have flagged it right away. would it not -- >> if the couple wouldn't have come it wouldn't have required a phone call. >> that's true, too. >> i understand, and -- and generally when people have questions, sheryl when you have a question, april, when you have a question, i don't have to be there in person to answer your question despite the fact that you may announce your question. generally you can pick up the telephone and reach me right there in my office. >> the press secretary robert gibbs getting pounded with some serious questions there. let's bring in our senior white house correspondent ed henry once again. ed, you had your own questions for the press secretary. were they answered? >> reporter: well, not exactly. i mean, what you heard ro
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